Charlene Allen, Common Justice

Session: Trial and Error: Lessons in Healing and Systems Advocacy from the Movement to End Domestic Violence / 1:35 – 2:40

Charlene Allen, Esq., leads Common Justice’s Learning Collaborative for young men of color who have been harmed by violence. Charlene has worked with survivors of crime and trauma for more than twenty years as an attorney, advocate, and educator. She led one of the first statewide domestic violence coalitions as lobbyist/organizer for Jane Doe, Inc., before taking the position of executive director at the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. As an attorney, she taught and provided clinical supervision at Northeastern University’s Domestic Violence Law Clinic. Serving as legal director of Emerge, Inc., she led education groups for abusive men. Prior to joining Common Justice, Charlene worked for the Criminal Justice Initiative for more than a decade, helping to identify and fund community-based organizations that address exploitation, abuse, and racial bias within the criminal justice system.

Willard Beale, CASES

Session: Healing Through Service / 2:55 – 4:00

Wilard Beale is a social engineer, navigating community and individual needs.  He has over eight years of experience working with youth and young adults touched by the justice system.  He currently services as the Director of the Queens Justice Corps programs where he oversees the development of community benefits projects, internships and job placements.

Iris Bowen, Spencer Cox Center for Health at the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine

Session: Coming Home and Staying Home: Moving Beyond the Trauma of Solitary Confinement and Incarceration / 2:55 – 4:00

Iris Bowen is a Program Coordinator for the Coming Home Program at the Spencer Cox Center for Health of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine. Ms. Bowen conducts needs assessments and provides reentry services for formerly incarcerated people returning home from prison. Her services include care planning for individuals and co-facilitating substance abuse recovery groups. Ms. Bowen will graduate with her MSW in May, and as someone who prioritizes social justice, she plans to use her degree to advocate for those people that otherwise do not have a voice for themselves whether politically, socially or ethically.

Ramid Brown, Newark United Against Violence/CCI

Session: Growing Up and Growing Out: Providing Meaningful Assistance to Young People Exposed to Violence/ 11:15 – 12:20

The youngest of five children in a single-parent household, Ramid Brown was born and raised in Newark, NJ. He describes his childhood as typical of any kid growing up in poverty. At the age of 19, Ramid left home to pursue a music career and toured the world between 1994 and 1996; however, when he returned home, he joined a gang and in 2003 he was arrested for conspiracy to commit racketeering. The case was dismissed after going to court for a year. Ramid then decided to change his lifestyle, becoming more involved in his community and working to reduce violence. In 2004 he worked with rival gang leaders and elected city officials to call a cease fire agreement between the gangs, including 150 Bloods and 150 Crips. He then joined the Newark Anti Violence Coalition and rallied throughout the city protesting against violence. Ramid has traveled the country doing panel discussions on gang violence and intervention. He has also facilitated conflict resolution and gang prevention in numerous local high schools throughout Essex and Union County New Jersey. In 2013 Ramid was hired as an Outreach Worker for Newark Community Solutions as part of the Newark United Against Violence Initiative. He continues to work every day to build a better environment for young people in his community.

Latania Cobb, Newark United Against Violence/CCI

Session: Growing Up and Growing Out: Providing Meaningful Assistance to Young People Exposed to Violence/ 11:15 – 12:20

Latania Cobb was born in Jersey City, NJ. She graduated from Kenmare High School, an alternative school for women. Latania earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Public Policy and Urban Studies from Saint Peter’s University in Jersey City and most recently she earned her Master’s Degree in Social Work from Adelphi University. Latania has also received training from the New Jersey State Parole Board, the National Institute of Corrections, and New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development so that she could help to combat the employment barriers ex-offenders face once they are released through offering career assessment and workforce development. Latania has worked in Essex, Hudson and Union Counties, serving their communities for 19 years. She has been recognized by many non-profit agencies, including the Urban League and Women Rising, for her commitment and dedication to helping women and men to improve the quality of their lives. Latania now serves as the Re-entry Case Manager for Newark Community Solutions’ Anti-Violence Initiative, Newark United Against Violence  where she provides Cognitive Behavior Therapy to 18-30 year old individuals who have been affected by violence.

Dr. Charles C. Edwards, School of Education, Brooklyn College, CUNY

Session: Trauma Informed School Counseling Practices: Exploring the Role of School Counselors in Supporting Young Men of Color / 2:55 – 4:00

William Evans, Fortune Society

Sessions: (1) For Men of Color Living is a Radical Act — Why? / 9:30 – 11:00 & (2) Understanding for Healing and Recovery / 11:15 – 12:20

William Evans is a victim of gun violence, and learned that recovery comes not only through journalism and the people around you, but also through the art of giving back. He is an ATI Counselor at the Fortune Society (previously titled Counselor & Community Liaison due to the work he committed his time to outside of the organization). Previous to work at Fortune, he witnessed violence and was violent. He learned the importance of life after having his first son. He understood the violence would not stop with him, but may continue through his son or victimize his son. From that point he acknowledged the pain he caused others and the pain others caused him. He realized he had more to offer and chose to seek support and guidance. Fortune Society has allowed him to prevent others from making a mistake as he did  as a youth. He is grateful for the opportunity to encourage and motivate our young men and women today. He stands as a resource for the lost individuals roaming our streets daily. This is the reason he understands and appreciates the work that he does.

Victoria Frye, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Session: Programs Created to Change the Impact of Violence and Trauma on the Brooklyn LGBT Youth and Young Adult Communities / 2:55 – 4:00

Assistant Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Mariel Gallego, Spencer Cox Center for Health at the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine

Session: Coming Home and Staying Home: Moving Beyond the Trauma of Solitary Confinement and Incarceration / 2:55 – 4:00

Mariel Gallego, Ph.D. is a supervising psychologist at the Spencer Cox Center for Health of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Director of the Staying Home Program, a substance abuse program for individuals with a history of incarceration.  Her clinical expertise is in working with substance users, marginalized populations, LGBTQ people, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the integration of Buddhist meditation and psychotherapy.

Richard Gamarra, Spencer Cox Center for Health at the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine

Session: Coming Home and Staying Home: Moving Beyond the Trauma of Solitary Confinement and Incarceration / 2:55 – 4:00

Richard Gamarra is a Community Health Advocate at the Spencer Cox Center for Health of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine. As a staff member for the Coming Home Program, he performs patient navigation and advocacy services for people with histories of incarceration in order to reengage them with healthcare and other social services, as well as health counseling and health education sessions to promote health and prevent disease. His personal experiences with incarceration, solitary confinement, gang involvement, violence, substance abuse, and reentry allow him to connect with Coming Home participants and help them access the necessary resources for a smoother, successful transition into their communities.

Lisa Good, Crime Victims/Sexual Violence Center

Session: A Terrible Thing Happened: A Trauma-Informed Approach / 11:15-12:30

Khalif Harris, Newark United Against Violence/CCI

Session: Growing Up and Growing Out: Providing Meaningful Assistance to Young People Exposed to Violence / 11:15 – 12:20

Khalif Harris is a Newark native who was a part of the first cohort of the Newark United Against Violence Initiative. Khalif was raised in a community plagued by violence and poverty. At only 23 years old, he has already buried one brother, two cousins, and a host of friends because of violent crime. A father of three and committed partner, Khalif has a unique perspective when it comes to identifying what helps young men like him heal. In December 2014, Khalif spoke at a Town Hall meeting held by Newark Mayor Ras Baraka and received a standing ovation when he denounced gun violence and retaliation. He is now developing his own program, “New Beginnings: Love Your Brother and Sister No Matter What the Color,” to show local youth the alternatives to gang-life.

Teresa Hurst, Spencer Cox Center for Health at the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine

Session: Coming Home and Staying Home: Moving Beyond the Trauma of Solitary Confinement and Incarceration / 2:55 – 4:00

Teresa Hurst, PhD, is a supervising clinical psychologist at the Spencer Cox Center for Health of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Institute for Advanced Medicine. She conducts individual and group psychotherapy with people living with HIV and AIDS and people coming out of incarceration. Dr. Hurst also serves as the clinic supervisor for the St. Luke’s Care Coordination program, a home-based HIV treatment adherence program. As a social justice activist, Dr. Hurst is committed to the prevention and treatment of familial, street, and institutional trauma, and her training as a somatic movement therapist and body-centered gestalt therapist support these efforts.

Roberta Liggett, Citizens Crime Commission of NYC

Session: Harmful Social Media Use and Violence / 1:35 – 2:40

Roberta Liggett is a second-year Masters student in forensic psychology at New York University and an intern for the Crime Commission. Through her work with the Crime Commission, Roberta has researched social media and violence, focusing on creative solutions to address this emerging issue.

Wanda Lucibello, Brooklyn DA’s Office

Session: Trial and Error: Lessons in Healing and Systems Advocacy from the Movement to End Domestic Violence / 1:35 – 2:40

Ms. Lucibello is the Chief of the Special Victims Division in the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office. She has conducted training programs for police, prosecutors and service providers in the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence cases, in conjunction with the National College of District Attorneys and the New York Prosecutors Training Institute. At the request of the United States Department of State, she spent several weeks in 1998 and 2000 in Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa where she worked with prosecutors and women’s groups on new legislative initiatives in family violence. In conjunction with the Office on Violence Against Women in Washington, D.C., she assisted in the preparation of a prosecutor’s brochure on Full Faith and Credit in Interstate Orders of Protection.  Ms. Lucibello also helped to develop a training curriculum for the National Institute on the Prosecution of Domestic Violence in conjunction with the Office on Violence Against Women and the American Prosecutors Research Institute. She also served on the National Advisory Board for the President’s Family Justice Center Initiative, and was instrumental in the establishment of the Family Justice Center in Brooklyn, New York. Ms. Lucibello is currently an Adjunct Professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York City.

Rukia Lumumba, CASES

Session: Healing Through Service / 2:55 – 4:00

Rukia Lumumba serves as the director of the department of Youth Programs at CASES where she focuses on issues of criminal and juvenile justice transformation and service development. In a career spanning over fifteen years, Lumumba has a rich history of advancing issues and initiatives that elevate the legal, economical and educational health of individuals, families and communities. She served as Director of Youth Services at the Center for Community Alternatives (CCA) where she oversaw the development and management of CCA’s youth services unit. She clerked for the Juvenile Service Program of the Washington, DC Public Defender Service where she represented youth detained in juvenile facilities on their claims against staff abuse and inhumane living conditions. Additionally, she was program director of Parent Watch, Inc., a Washington, DC based non-profit agency that supported and assisted parents in advocating for the release of their detained children. She founded the Community Aid and Development Youth Camp providing academic, cultural and social support for young people ages 6 to 16 years old. She served on the board of directors of the National Conference of Black Lawyers, an association of activists and legal workers who defend human rights and expose the over-incarceration of people of color. She served as National Chair of the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, a membership-based organization dedicated to promoting human rights and self-determination. She co-founded Katrina on the Ground, an initiative that organized hundreds of people to participate in post-Hurricane Katrina relief efforts in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama. Lumumba holds a BA in Political Science from Tougaloo College in Mississippi, has studied law and politics in South Africa at the University of Forte Hare and the University of the Western Cape, and holds a JD from Howard University School of Law in Washington, DC.

David Matthews, Brooklyn Men (K)onnect

Session: Programs Created to Change the Impact of Violence and Trauma on the Brooklyn LGBT Youth and Young Adult Communities / 2:55 – 4:00

Program Manager, Bridging Access To Care, Brooklyn Men (K)onnect

Shameeka Mattis, Common Justice

Session: A View Inside a Self-Knowledge Circle: Helping Young Men of Color Navigate the Pathways / 1:35 – 2:40

Shameeka Mattis, LMSW is a social worker and Assistant Director of Programs for Common Justice based in Brooklyn, NY. She has years of experience in working with this population both in Philadelphia, PA and New York City. Shameeka Mattis has recently been honored as an “Emerging Leader” by the National Association of Social Workers for her service to young people affected by the adversities of life.

Onaje Muid, Reality House Inc.

Session: Toward the Understanding and Healing from Institutional Racism and Historical Trauma / 11:15 – 12:20

Mr. Muid is a human rights activist and human service provider who has worked to demand reparations for Africans in America for the damage done to them by the American government. He is a seasoned clinical professional holding a Masters in Social Work from Stony Brook University and a Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor, certified by the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. His piece “…Then I Lost My Spirit: An Analytic Essay on Transgenerational Trauma Theory as Applied To Oppressed People of Color” explored the intersectionality of violence, trauma, substance abuse, and cultural competency in the context of human rights principles, treaties and conventions. Currently he is the Clinical Associate Director of a human services/drug addiction treatment agency in Queens, NY called Reality House, Inc.

Linda Rich, Healing Hurt People

Session: Language of the Unheard: Digital Stories and Healing From Trauma / 1:35 – 2:40

Linda Rich, MA is the Director of Education and Consultation at the Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice and at the Healing Hurt People program at Drexel University College of Medicine. She has over 25 years of experience in psychotherapy, research, health policy analysis and program planning, implementation and evaluation. Her previous work included the creation of a training/professional development component to a large-scale community based parenting network; guiding grant-request and funding processes; and establishing a standardized evaluation system for parenting education. Ms. Rich has worked in a range of non profit organizations in the human services field, as a clinician (psychologist) in women’s health and mental health settings; in health policy in the National Health and Human Services Program at the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Best Practices Institute; and as a consultant for The Ford Foundation and for the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Children’s Policy.

Ms. Rich holds a Master’s degree in Community Psychology from Temple University and a Bachelor’s degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

Her work at the Center/HHP includes developing the training and consultation program area, and has included overseeing clinical operations; program evaluation research including developing a case management database; policy research and training activities. She also played a key role in conceptualizing and conducting policy research for the Office of Minority Health and the California Endowment funded projects for CNSJ.

Katy Rubin, Theatre of the Oppressed

Session: Theatre of the Oppressed with Court-Involved Young Men of Color / 2:55 – 4:00

Katy Rubin, Executive Director of Theatre of the Oppressed NYC, is a Joker, actor and circus artist. She has facilitated and directed Forum and Legislative Theatre workshops and performances in partnership with various communities including homeless adults and youth; LGBT homeless teens; people living with HIV/AIDS; recent immigrants; and court-involved youth and adults. Katy trained with Augusto Boal at the Center for Theatre of the Oppressed—Rio de Janeiro, and later with Jana Sanskriti in India, Mind the Gap in Yorkshire and Cardboard Citizens in London. She has trained facilitators in Nicaragua, the Netherlands, Norway and New Orleans as well as NYC. She holds a BFA in Acting from the Boston University School of Theatre, and is a TCG Global connections grantee.

Lisa Nelson-Haynes, Painted Bride Art Center/Center for Digital Storytelling

Session: Language of the Unheard: Digital Stories and Healing From Trauma / 1:35 – 2:40

Lisa Nelson-Haynes is associate director at the Painted Bride Art Center, a multidisciplinary presenting arts organization in Philadelphia. In addition to bringing world-class art and artists to Philadelphia from around the region, country and globe, Lisa enjoys developing engagement activities that take artists beyond the performance stage to further engage audiences in the art-making process. Lisa has been facilitating digital storytelling workshops for the Center for Digital Storytelling for more than six years and often refers to her role in the workshop process as a midwife, assisting workshop participants through the birthing process of creating their digital story.

Anna Ortega-Williams, Fordham University Graduate School of Social Services

Session: Resilience, Resistance, and Recovery: Transforming Trauma and Transforming the World / 2:55 – 4:00

Anna Ortega-Williams, LMSW is a doctoral candidate in Social Work at Fordham University’s Graduate School of Social Service. Ms. Ortega-Williams is a licensed social worker and has provided individual, group and family counseling in New York City since 2002.  Her research and practice specialty areas are youth development, strengths-based social work practice, multi-family group work, holistic peer-led mental health promotion, community organizing, organizational development, and program evaluation. Anna, a long-time activist born and raised in public housing in the Bronx, is committed to racial and economic justice grounded in human rights. As one of the founding members of the Radical Social Work Group, she believes the social work profession can be a force in the 21st century, which powerfully and uniquely shapes the world we live in. As a social work researcher, her goals are to positively impact community well-being and expand the boundaries of current mental health practices in low-income communities for youth of color to include healing from historical and present-day trauma.

Donnell Penny, Common Justice

Session: For Men of Color Living is a Radical Act — Why? / 9:30 – 11:00

Whitney Rog, Center for Child Trauma and Resilience at Mount Sinai

Session: Understanding Trauma and Learning How to Manage Stress While Focusing on Personal Goals / 11:15 – 12:20

Whitney Rog, PsyD, is a postdoctoral fellow working in the Center for Child Trauma and Resilience at MSBI. Dr. Rog has specialized training in assessment and treatment of traumatized youth, including the implementation of TF-CBT and SPARCS, as well as other trauma-informed care models. Dr. Rog earned her doctoral degree from St. John’s University. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Fordham University. Prior to joining the Center for Child Trauma and Resilience, Dr. Rog completed her clinical internship in the residential treatment facility at MercyFirst. She is a member of the American Psychological Association and the New York State Psychological Association.

Derrick Scott, Save Our Streets Bed Stuy

Session: For Men of Color Living is a Radical Act — Why? / 9:30 – 11:00

Thanecha Senat, Project Accept LGBTQ Youth (ALY)

Session: Programs Created to Change the Impact of Violence and Trauma on the Brooklyn LGBT Youth and Young Adult Communities / 2:55 – 4:00

Project Manager/Supervisor I, Project Accept LGBTQ Youth (ALY)

Carolyn Strudwick, Safe Horizon Streetwork Program

Session: Addressing Violence, Trauma & Vulnerability in Young Men of Color / 1:35 – 2:40

Carolyn Strudwick is the Associate Vice President for Safe Horizon’s Youth Program, Streetwork Project. In this role she oversees Safe Horizon’s Streetwork Project homeless youth 2 drop-in centers, crisis shelter and outreach component for youth. The Streetwork Project provides a comprehensive array of case management and supportive services to disenfranchised young people up to age 24 on the streets and at our drop-in centers providing immediate assistance and offering a stable non-judgmental setting. Ms. Strudwick began her career in social services at Safe Horizon in 1993 as an Outreach Worker and Case Manager at the Streetwork Program. During her 17 year tenure with the program, she has worked with street-involved youth in many capacities including group facilitator, clinical case manager and shelter supervisor.  She also served in the role of Senior Director managing programmatic functions and contributing to ongoing program developments. Ms. Strudwick received her masters in Social Work from Silbermann School of Social Work of the City University of New York in 2007. She is a seasoned and leading expert among youth providers in New York City.

Ray Tebout, MindFrame Development Solutions

Session: For Men of Color Living is a Radical Act — Why? / 9:30 – 11:00

Ray Tebout, SPHR, CASAC, is the founder and chief consultant at MindFrame Development Solutions, a human resource consulting company that provides HR solutions for individuals and organizations with an interest in social and criminal justice. Ray has 10 years of experience in counseling, coaching, management, and consulting. He has worked as a counselor for court-involved clients, a trainer, and technical advisor, and was most recently the Director of Counseling and Mentoring at the College Initiative, a non-profit organization that assists people with criminal records in accessing college. Ray holds a BA in Transitional Counseling Psychology and Economic Empowerment from the City University of New York, and is credentialed in strategic human resources, addiction counseling, and strength-based human service practices.

Dr. Kaemanje Thomas, Touro College

Session: Trauma Informed School Counseling Practices: Exploring the Role of School Counselors in Supporting Young Men of Color

Stephanie Ueberall, Citizens Crime Commission of NYC

Session: Harmful Social Media Use and Violence / 1:35 – 2:40

Through the Associate Program Director position at the Crime Commission, Stephanie works to support programs serving youth involved in gun violence. Before providing technical assistance to community-based organizations, like Save Our Streets Crown Heights, Stephanie provided direct services to youth for six years in a wide range of settings including crisis centers, schools, counseling programs, after school programs, and research. Within these roles Stephanie has facilitated many groups with youth, covering an array of topics from cognitive behavioral therapy to how to take notes. Stephanie is excited to share her experience and improve the lives of youth through the Crown Heights Community Mediation Center Conference.

Rommell Washington, Mt. Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital Crime Victims Treatment Center

Session: A View Inside a Self-Knowledge Circle: Helping Young Men of Color Navigate the Pathways / 1:35 – 2:40

Rommell Washington, LCSW is an activist and clinical social worker. He has worked at Mt. Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital Crime Victims Treatment Center for ten years, providing individual and group psychotherapy to survivors of sexual assault, domestic and community violence with a trauma-informed lens.